Aboot the Projeck

Wee Windaes is a wark in progress till September 2017. As Scots Scriever fir the Naitional Leebrar o Scotland, I howp that whither new tae Scots, or aiblins mair weel-kent wi its literature an story, veesitors will fin thair interest kinnelt in the Scots leid – as tauld through a hairstin frae the collections at the Naitional Leebrar o Scotland.

The stairtin pynt is a performance poem frae the 1440s, prentit bi Chepman an Myllar at Edinbrugh in 1508, whiles the end pynt will be the present day. Gien that the spoken wird, as weel as a virrsome literary tradition, hae been vital tae the ongaun story o the Scots leid, I howp tae shaw Scots in its mony varit forms:

  • performance
  • folk tale
  • sang
  • proclamation
  • scripture
  • satire
  • drama
  • novels and poetry

I will alsae tak a luik at some o the byordinar lives o its scrievers, makars an shenachies alang the wey. Bi keekin in through the Wee Windaes, frae the 15th century tae the present day, we luik tae chairt the continuum o the Scots leid.

Hamish MacDonald, Scots Scriever

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About the Project

Wee Windaes is a work in progress until September 2017. As Scots Scriever for the National Library of Scotland, I hope that whether new to Scots, or perhaps more familiar with its literature and story, visitors will find their interest stimulated in the Scots language – as told through a sampling from the collections at the National Library of Scotland.

The starting point is a performance poem from the 1440s, printed by Chepman and Myllar at Edinburgh in 1508, while the end point will be the present day. Given that the spoken word, as well as a lively literary tradition, have been vital to the ongoing story of the Scots language, I hope to show Scots in its many varied forms:

  • performance
  • folk tale
  • song
  • proclamation
  • scripture
  • satire
  • drama
  • novels and poetry

I will also take a look at some of the extraordinary lives of its authors, poets and storytellers along the way. By looking in through the Wee Windaes, from the 15th  century to the present day, we look to chart the continuum of the Scots language.

Hamish MacDonald, Scots Scriever